Kitchen

Mar 29 2018

How to Paint Kitchen Cabinets, how-tos, DIY, painting kitchen cabinets.#Painting #kitchen #cabinets

How to Paint Kitchen Cabinets

Start to Finish

  • fine-grit sandpaper
  • sanding block
  • tack cloth
  • steel wool
  • paint applicator
  • primer sealer
  • painter’s tape
  • semigloss paint
  • denatured alcohol
  • trisodium phosphate (TSP)

How to Paint Kitchen Cabinets 10:22

Size-Up the Job

Wood, wood-laminate, and metal cabinets usually can be repainted without difficulty. Plastic laminate cabinets resist overpainting — those that can be refinished often require special paints and techniques, and results can vary. If your cabinets have plastic laminate surfaces, first check with a knowledgeable paint dealer, and test a sample of the paint you wish to use in an inconspicuous area to ensure that it will bond to the material.

Flat-front doors and drawers are easily repainted, but woodwork with raised panels, routed profiles or other architectural detailing will require more time to prep and paint. If the woodwork is warped, badly worn or damaged, or coming apart at the glued joints, you can opt to buy new unfinished doors and drawers and paint them along with your existing cabinets.

Applicator options for repainting include spraying, rolling or brushing with either a natural or synthetic bristle brush or a foam brush. All have their advantages and disadvantages; choose whichever is most suited to the amount of woodwork to be repainted and your own style of working. The best applicator also may depend on the type of paint or finish you choose.

Step 1

Painting kitchen cabinets

Painting kitchen cabinets

Painting kitchen cabinets

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Blue painters tape used to number the cabinet doors.

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Woman uses a drill to remove the hinges from a cabinet.

Remove Doors and Hardware

Start by removing the cabinet doors and drawers and remove all pulls, knobs, latches and other hardware from these parts. Place the hardware and screws in plastic bags inside the cabinets where they will be easy to locate when you’re ready to reassemble everything (Image 1).

Number each door and its corresponding location as you remove them (Image 2). Do not mix them up or the hinges may not line up properly when you reinstall them (Image 3). If you are painting only the drawer fronts, you won’t have to remove the attached slides. If you do need to remove the slides, mark them and their locations as well.

Step 2

Painting kitchen cabinets

Painting kitchen cabinets

Amy uses a spray bottle of cleaner to wipe off the tiled and cabinets before doing the cabinet upgrade.

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Amy uses a spray bottle of cleaner to wipe off the tiled and cabinets before doing the cabinet upgrade.

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Amy uses a spray bottle of cleaner to wipe off the tiled and cabinets before doing the cabinet upgrade.

Clean Surfaces

Kitchens are work areas, so grease, steam, and food splatters are common. Before you begin sanding or painting, clean all of the surfaces to be repainted with a solution made from one part tri-sodium phosphate and four parts water. Rinse, but do not soak the cabinets. Allow them to dry thoroughly.

Painting Cabinets: Sanding 02:11

Step 3

Painting kitchen cabinets

Painting kitchen cabinets

Painting kitchen cabinets

Painting kitchen cabinets

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Closeup of Amy sanding the cabinet door using a sander.

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Amy uses a sand block to sand the front of the cabinet doors while wearing a mask.

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DIY Host Amy Matthews uses a vacuum to clean out the cabinets before painting them.

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Woman uses a tack cloth to wipe edges of cabinet door.

Lightly sand the doors on all sides and faces (Image 1). Use a wood sanding block to prevent rounding over the wood edges (Image 2). If your repainting project is just a facelift for the cabinets, you don’t need to sand and paint the inside of the cabinets; mask off the interiors with painters’ tape for a clean finish and sand only the front surfaces and visible edges of the cabinet face frames.

When sanding, there is no need to remove all of the old paint if it is sound and well-adhered; just roughen the surface to provide the new paint with a firm, clean base for better adhesion. Pay particular attention to especially worn areas of old finish, which typically get the most use. Also be sure to sand over shiny areas to deglaze any remaining previous finish. Stubborn finishes may require rubbing with denatured alcohol and fine steel wool.

If the old paint is flaking off in places, it indicates the finish did not adhere well to the wood surface. This is typically due to moisture or greasy residue getting under the paint layer or into the wood itself, which can be expected in kitchens. Sand these areas to bare wood and spot-prime with a stain-killing primer/sealer before repainting. Wherever you sand down to bare wood, try to blend or “feather” the edges where the old paint meets the wood so the new paint will lay flat, and the paint edges will not be visible or “telegraph” through the new finish.

Thoroughly vacuum the sanding dust from all surfaces (Image 3). If you have a pneumatic air compressor, use high-pressure air to blow the dust out of crevices or molding details. Wipe down the areas to be painted with a tack cloth to pick up any remaining sanding residue (Image 4).





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